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High-value works of art are, and will always be, an attractive target for criminals. Museums and international events that display and/or offer valuable pieces for sale are presented with a complex challenge to ensure adequate security yet retain a welcoming environment for the public.

Museums, with their ever-changing displays, need to create an aesthetically pleasing layout of their art. In addition, there needs to be various areas where visitors can sit and contemplate, without the intrusion of multiple security guards causing an atmosphere that might not be conducive to such pondering, yet still be sure that adequate provisions are in place to secure what are often priceless pieces.

 When it comes to one-off exhibitions and events, such as the annual Art Basel that takes place in Switzerland, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong, these concerns are further magnified as the displays not only have to be transported from country to country, but every set-up is different and comes with individual security conundrums.Woman in art museum

The Artful Combination Of Security Solutions

Be it a museum, exhibition, or art fair, any event needs the provision of an expert security agency to employ a variety of defensive precautions. When securing items of high monetary value there are many low and high-tech options that security services use to their advantage. These include:

  • Motion detectors: That sounds an alarm if someone comes too close to a piece on display. Not only does it startle the person in question, but it also alerts security as to the breach. 
  • Vibration sensors: Small, wireless, and a very effective security tool, these sound an alarm and/or alert at even the slightest touch. Fully customizable, they can provide an alert to a cell phone, pager, security control room, and computer, and even provide an exact map to the piece of art in question.
  • Strategic borders: Although these won’t deter a professional art thief, placing a border around the edge of a display area, such as a rail, rope, or difference in flooring type or height, creates a border that most people will respect shouldn’t be crossed.
  • Numbered inventory: Most high-value paintings have numbers on the back of the canvas. This not only serves as a record in a catalog but allows for easy collation of data about the piece, such as detailed photographs and canvas thread count.

Events such as the upcoming Art Basel in Miami Beach, Florida, work with the ultimate in security services to ensure that the priceless works of art on show are staunchly protected. This is done using a combination of the latest in technology and a highly skilled physical presence. 

21st century art thieves are ingenious in their methods to target pieces of high value, and the provision of security experts, such as Fast Guard Service, to curate a highly specialized, multi-layered protection strategy is a crucial part of such event planning.